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New York Hashing Out Bill, Hoboken may expand trial

2019-12-2

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New Jersey and New York Moving Slowly on Sharable Scooters

Similiar to the progress on legalizing marijuana, New York and New Jersey are moving slowly on sharable electric scooters. While New York Legislature did pass a bill legalizing privately owned scooters this summer, they are sitting on the bill in Albany. According to Curbed, Curbed - Electric Scooter Bill Stalled Governor Cuomo has some reservations about the bill. If passed by the end of the year (fingers crossed) the bill will allow personal owned scooters to operate in New York state, BUT, will still prevent sharable scooters from operating in New York City.

It seems that New York's capital up in Albany is preferring to play politcs rather than helping people improve their lives. In the meantime, scooters are available in New Jersey's Hoboken right across the river from Manhattan. Go give them a try!

Additionally, Massachusetts has several cities with rentable e-scooters available like Boston, Brookline and Salem. While the state has no state-wide regulation, according to an article on GovTech GovernmenetTechnology-Massachusetts Lawmakers want statewide rules for E-scooters regulators see a need for state-wide rules to improve safety and transportation access.

UPDATE:

According to the NY Post (click for article) NY governor Andrew Cuomo has vetoed the e-scooter bill, meaning that riding e-scooters on the streets of Manhattan is STILL illegal and can result in fines and other penalties. This goes for the rest of the state as well. Our non-professional guess, is that the bill's sponsors will try again next year with tweaks to the bill, or that they will try and pass this with an overwheleming majority next year. According to NYstate.gov

"Vetoed bills are returned to the house that first passed them, together with a statement of the reason for their disapproval. A vetoed bill can become law if two-thirds of the members of each house vote to override the Governor's veto."

So, there is still a chance, given the number of state legistlators that voted for the bill during the summer.

Fingers crossed.

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